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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
it is obvious that mohammed morsi fully intends to create hard line islamist regime there as explained in the last 80 years of the group's history. somehow "the new york times" manages to find that moderate, unquote. jon: you're right, jim it is kirkpatrick, that's why you're so good keeping an eye on the media, including me. let's see what president obama had to say when hosni mubarak was in power listen to this. >> it is not the role of any other country to determine egypt's leaders, only the egyptian people can do that. what is clear, and what i indicated tonight to president hosni mubarak is my belief that an orderly transition must be meaningful, it must be peaceful, and it must begin now. jon: so, the president got his wish. hosni mubarak ended up leaving office and look at what we have. who is this guy, this muslim brotherhood member, alan? >> it wasn't up to president obama to change government in egypt. it didn't happen because of president obama it happened because of an arab spring and it happened organically because the people in egypt, which is the way it should happen, we
, this is in cairo. it was there last night that supporters and owe points of president mohamed morsi clashed. they hurled rocks and molotov cocktails at each other. at least five people were killed, hundreds injured. the root of the violence is what many believe is morsi's grab for power. ian lee joins us this morning. what's happening right now. >> reporter: we have the elite republican guard, the people tasked with protecting the president. they are putting up barbed wire and road blocks, diverting traffic and people away and trying to keep the two sides, the pro-morsi and the anti-morsi protesters away from each other. last flight we saw thousands of pro-morsi supporters camp outside of the presidential palace, that is after they went there and removed, by force, the anti-morsi protesters. but now we have a small -- protests are planned for today against morsi and their plan to defe descend, again, on the presidential palace. >> a direct constitution has been approved and egyptians are scheduled to vote on it next week. is there something in this proposal that has protesters so angry? >>
's that the government and the forces of mohammed morsi are just better at getting people to the polls to vote for it. >> precisely and that's why this kind of super presidency is so dangerous. it's not like he's getting 80% of the vote. in the last election, he won just 24% of the vote. then they had a run off, then he got 51% o f the vote. egypt is a divided country. the question is, can the liberals, democrats and the good guys organize themselves to fight this stuff. exactly. >> form a party, so to speak. >> rather than four. and you know what? this is going to be their drama and they've got to make it work. >> and the drama today with this move seems rather frightening for people who watched what happened in tahrir square. we all watched as camels and horses came in and attacking people and beating them. what do we know about the kind of martial law that the president decided needs to be instill? >> he claims it's temporary. it's bet erat than ruling by constitutional decree. the constitution everyone wants to put in place would not allow him to do this kind of thing. let's hope it's a temporary
. this is what it looks like as the planet begins -- and i underline begins -- to warm pita mohamed mursi had been declared the winner in each presidential race. >> we will respect agreements and international law as well as egyptian commitments and treaties with the rest of the world. >> to talk about the significance of election, we are joined by sharif of del produce. >> the first democratically elected in egypt's history. his win marks a victory over the lingering remnants of mubarak's regime. >> chief justice john roberts prove to be the surprise deciding vote. joining with the court's liberal members. >> the highest court in the land has not spoken. we will continue to implement this law and we will work together to improve on where we can. >> me state the positive first. this really is a huge victory for our side. in spite of all of my concerns with this law, it did not go far enough, it does not cover all americans, it is not true universal health care. nonetheless, the right wing has been handed a serious defeat today. >> we begin today's show in mexico where the old ruling party, th
in egypt, mohamed morsi is rescind iing h new law. >>> a new report says new york routinely ignored warning to prepare for a catastrophic hurricane. the warning started back in 1978 when a law was passed requiring the creation of a disaster plan. never happened. largely because of tight budgets or the lack of political drive to prepare for a storm many thought would never hit. it hit. >>> he said he always thought he'd be the next college baseball player. turned out the guy loves football. johnny manziel is the first freshman to win the heisman trophy. he took the top honors saturday night after a record-breaking debut including an upset victory against number one alabama back in november. >>> finally, santa's elves may have competition in japan. penguins at an aquarium have taken on the role of santa's little helpers. in the evening they have the special task of switching on the christmas lights, but before you get excited, by day, all they do is lounge around and do little to nothing so basically it's sort of their civic duty to do the whole lights thing. that is the news. back to erica a
between unions and management. martha: egyptian protesters keeping up the pressure on president mohammed morsi. the latest in the clashes in tahrir square. the next hour of "america's newsroom" is coming up. don't go away. [ male announcer ] when was the last time something made your jaw drop? campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day. when someone tries to take over your bank accounts, drain the equity in your home, or
.com today. >> reporter: that require square, that's where opponents of egyptian president mohamed morsi are demonstrating. there was a shooting here earlier today. the focus, however, tonight is a few miles from where we are right now. the presidential palace. anti-morsi protesters are there in very big numbers trying to knock down the barrier defending that palace, all the while supporters of morsi and the members of the muslim brotherhood already nearby, they were involved in deadly clashes last week. so far they have been separate. a different time perhaps. since then, the military has been trying to grant morsi wide powers to intervene, arrest and get involved to try to calm things down. a lot of attention, as you noted, being paid tonight to the planned referendum on saturday on a draft constitution for egypt. critics say morsi's just trying to push it through, that it is islamist, that it is discriminatory and that he is acting in the last couple of weeks like some strongmen of the past here in egypt. for his part, morsi and his supporters say, hey, they've been elected democratic
in the raid that freed the colorado man being held hostage. abc's mohamed lila has the the latest. >> reporter: it happened under the cover of darkness. joint american and afghanistan special forces raid to rescue this man, dr. joseph, an american doctor working for colorado based charity morning star development. >> this is a team that has had lots of training on hostage rescues. until you get in there and do it you never know what you will find. >> reporter: here's how it went down. wednesday, joseph and two afghan colleagues were returning from a medical clinic when kidnapped at a checkpoint along the holloway by armed militants. they were taken to a mountainous region, afghan captives were released, but joseph wasn't, spending three terrifying days in captivity. when u.s. intelligence showed joseph's life was in military danger the military made its move. >> a hostage rescue mission is really, really dangerous and carries a high risk, the hostage him or herself could be injured or killed. you need some body at a high level to say i am authorizing this mission. >> reporter: knowing the risk
, the response is nothing. mohammed's son tells us, "today, i sent my brother to get bread at 6:00 a.m." look, it's 3:00 p.m. right now and he hasn't gotten any. the kids haven't eaten." the power is out, as it has been for weeks. and now the water is cut as well. there is a growing sense of desperation among people here. stalked by both hunger and danger. "god gave me these children. these children are my responsibility," the man laments. now i can't even get them a loaf of bread. before, i could. now, i can't. the price of bread has skyrocketed due to a flour shortage. along with it, a population's anger. the situation is so dire that people say society is beginning to disintegrate. this is yet another bread line. we were just at one further up the road where the crowd ended up mobbing around us, furious. they said that they wanted us to leave because they were fed up with people filming them. they feel as if the world is simply mocking their misery. and just four days, the cost of fuel jumped from 85 syrian pounds to 150. but beyond the now astronomical cost of survival, it's the constant fear
: violent protest erupt in egypt overnight. overnight opponents of president mohammed morsi continue to demand that he step down since his power grab last month and back off. officials say at leastt 7 people were killed and more than 600 hurt in the last day or so . now the u.s. members of congress are callog the state department to suspend the two billion that we give egypt claiming that morce yehis men stand with terrorist. yoinning us now is vern bucan an. thanks for being here. congressman, thanks for being here. you want to see the two billion to be pulled back. >> i am introducing legislation to freeze the two billion. over the 30 years 60 billion and look at what is happening in egypt. they are supporting hamas and pull would their ambassador out of israel. why do we have to buy our friends especially we have concerns here. it is 52 billion in foreign aid. i am going to introduce legislation to freeze the two billion in egypt. >> brian: senator lindsay graham said we are watching you to see what is going on. i am just wondering in the big picture. if we need the leverage in tw
as supporters and opponents of president mohamed morsi demonstrate ahead of a saturday vote on a measure giving morsi sweeping new powers. >>> they are digging out in the upper midwest after the first major snowstorm of the season. some areas got slammed with more than a foot and a half of the white stuff. >>> that's good news to the folks in coleman, wisconsin. they got almost no snow last year. but now snowmobile enthusiasts and other outdoor types can't wait for those trails to open up. i like snow. >> you can have it. >>> here's a look at your weather today. blustery in fargo and minneapolis. could see flurries. showers along the southeast coast. severe weather is a threat in central florida. sunny in the southwest. >> 15 degrees cooler in the northeast with new york city in the 40s. dallas looks very pleasant at 55. kansas city, in the mid 40s. >>> last week we noted it wasn't looking good when it came to the nhl's ongoing labor dispute. and now breaking news, still ain't looking good. in fact, the league yesterday canceled all of its nhl games through december 30th. more than 40% of the r
out in tahrir square. also amassing supporters of president mohamed morsi and a controversial vote this weekend on a new constitution. today as you might imagine, tensions are very high as the political crisis threatens to ignite new conflicts. reza, what is happening now? >> reporter: ted, i don't think too many people want a repeat performance what have we saw last week, at the presidential palace where the two sides of the conflict met here and came to blows, nearly 700 people injured in clashes, several people killed. today the stage is set for another potentially violent and explosive day, because both these sides again have called for mass demonstrations within the next hour, opposition factions, critics of the president, have set out on marches that are going to culminate here at the presidential palace. in about 15, 20 minutes away from this location, that's where the muslim brotherhood, the supporters of the president, have called for their own demonstrations. i think a lot of people are relieved that these demonstrations aren't going to be at the same location but the pot
mohamed morsi, a scene of shooting earlier today. but the focus tonight, rick, is a few miles away from where we are right now, the presidential palace. anti--morsi protesters out there in big time. they've been trying to knock down a barrier made of rock and steel separating them and the palace, all the while supporters of morsi are gathering not too far away also in big numbers. there was a deadly clash between those two sides just one week ago. the fear is this could happen again. the difference, however, between now and then is that morsi in the interim has endowed the military here with stronger powers. they can intervene, maybe break up some violence. now, all the while this is all focused on that draft constitution which is planned for a vote, a referendum on saturday. the critics of morsi say that he's trying to rush it through. they say it's discriminatory towards segments of the population here, and they also say that his own style over the last couple weeks reminiscent of one other strong man we've seen here in egypt, mubarak. for his part morsi and his supporters say they we
has the support of egyptian president mohammed morsi and his islamic backers, but is opposed by moderate muslims and christians. critics of the constitution say it could allow religious leaders to restrict civil liberties, ignore women's rights, and undermine labor unions. >>> and just hours ago, we learned that nelson mandela underwent successful surgery to remove gall stones. he had the operation today, but has been in the hospital for eight days. government officials say mandela's doctors wanted to treat a recurrent lung infection before putting him through the surgery. >>> time now, 9:24. if you are heading out the door, it is cold out there. the question is, mark, should they bring an umbrella? >> that would be a good strategy, yeah. because the rain flow, if you've been watching the forecast, rain showers will be knocking on our door. cloudy and cool this morning. then rainfall soon developing across parts of the bay area. not a major deal in terms of significant rainfall, but still enough to wet the bay area roadways and current temperatures, chilly ones up towards san
are true even if mohamed morsi believes them. and one of those things is that there are a lot of old regime people around that have been really working to bring him down from the inside. even paranoids have enemies. he's a deeply paranoid guy right now. but he also is facing a lot of internal enemies. the overwhelming sense i had, mika, from being in egypt is how little the people there know each other. they have a blue states/red states problem that makes ours look like a day at the beach. and that's really -- as the lid has come off and you have these less religious brotherhood people and middle and upper class people from cairo and alexandria, these people do not know each other at all. this country really needs to go on a long weekend retreat. >> yeah, i don't think that's going to happen. you know, we saw the same thing, interestingly enough, in 2009 in iran where you had a lot of people in the cities opposing ahmadinejad, and you had people in more rural areas being far more conservative and supporting ahmadinejad. but carl bernstein, one of morsi's biggest problems right now is we lo
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)